By Jeremy Caplan, freelance writer

How a company announces a new project can mean the difference between big buzz and utter obscurity. Whether your team is launching a new initiative or reinventing an internal process, you’ll want to share information about the project to build support. Beyond using social media or email, it’s important to develop a strong visual Web presence.

Hiring a Web designer isn’t always practical for quick projects or short-term initiatives. Fortunately, new high-quality tools make the prospect of designing a simple, sleek site less daunting. 

Rebelmouse allows you to benefit from the social content you’re already creating. It’s quickly become one of the hippest new ways to show off the content you’re creating on Flickr, Instagram, TwitterFacebook  and YouTube. Rather than creating a static landing page, you can use Rebelmouse to pull together a dynamic scrapbook illustrated by your most recent posts. Dick’s Sporting Goods is one example of how a brand can use Rebelmouse to reach out to fans.

Another quick, easy way to build a slick landing page for a project is to use Flavors.me, which provides a range of clean, professional-looking templates where you can add photos and text. If you want to share social media updates, the service can pull them in automatically, like Rebelmouse, or you can link to relevant updates, images, videos or data on other services ranging from WordPress and Blogger to LinkedIn  or Tumblr. These examples give you a sense of the possibilities.

Padlet isn’t recommended for creating traditional sites for small-business initiatives or corporate projects. But it’s useful for building a quick online bulletin board. It can also be used to get feedback on an initiative, or share updates, videos, images and text to keep people in the loop on the progress of a project.

Storyboard.me allows you to put together a professional-looking press kit for a project or product quickly, cheaply and easily. Storyboard enables you to create a digital tile-based design likely to impress outsiders with your project’s polish.

Finally, if you have just a few minutes and need something to convey quick information, try CheckThis. Take a look at this simple page about a Kickstarter project to get a sense of how a plain CheckThis page can explain the premise behind a project. Sometimes a simple, straightforward site can be surprisingly sufficient.

 

This post originally appeared on Forbes.